Goodwin Hall at Camp Lawton

The buildings at Camp Lawton:  As you enter Camp Lawton from the road, Goodwin Hall, the dining hall, is close to the road. There is a full kitchen and wash area, commercial stove, refrigerator and freezer. Storage for all equipment and dishes. A bedroom and bathroom are furnished for a cook during camp sessions (see my previous article for more on Camp Lawton.) The little building next to Goodwin was the Hen House. there was a small library where campers could relax and visit. On occasion someone had to sleep in there over night. Camp Lawton was very versatile in that it could make changes on short notice. There was a shed for the riding lawn mower and other tools necessary.

A large meadow separated tent row and the other buildings down by the lake. Most outdoor activities were held in the meadow such as baseball and other competitive sports. There was a tennis court in one corner by Pyke Hall. Pyke Hall was one of the first buildings constructed.It was a memorial to Ralph Pyke, the first choirmaster and first camp director when Camp Lawton opened. The Women of the church raised the $1,900 for this building. Pyke Hall had a large stone fireplace on one end. It housed many activities. Campers put on plays, played games, did crafts and was a place to go when it rained. A small room kept game equipment and other items. Over the winter tents were hung from the rafters as storage and to dry out. Cots, mattresses and items that needed to be inside were stored in Pyke Hall.
The boat house was built as a memorial to Hal S. Woodruff, organist/choir director during 1916 – 1923. The boat house had storage for the fleet of small sail boats, canoes and rowboats on the lake level. The second floor had arts and crafts. A small room housed the Waterfront director. The law required a licensed life guard be present at all camp activities. An earlier Sauna was destroyed by fire. A new Sauna was built in the 1970’s with funds from Robert Gile, Jr. as a memorial to his father, Robert Gile, Sr. Robert, Sr. was a choir boy in the 1910-20 era, former treasurer of the camp and active in raising funds to buy the camp.He donated many of the aluminum boats and sailboats. All volunteer labor constructed the Sauna under the direction of Bill Nightingale. You may remember some of the crew: Dr. Ken Osterberg, Chris Ries, Scott Garoutte, Sr., Duff Johnston, Perry Smith and Win Trumbull. And a number of sideline carpenters. Perry Smith was City Engineer and obtained a stove for the Sauna.
A small building had the bathrooms. It was called the KYBO (keep your bowls open).  Because it was old and plumbing needed updating a new building was constructed with more stalls, urinals and showers. It was all cement block and modern plumbing. Goodwin Hall and the KYBO  had the only running water. Water needed in other areas had to be carried just like in the olden days.
…to be continued
Contributed by Rose Nightingale

Senior Warden Message – COVID-19 Update

“Church is not cancelled; it has changed.” This was the message shared in the bulletin and in the opening message of our first online Eucharist. In these challenging times of COVID-19 we need to find new ways to connect, new ways to gather, and new ways to replenish our spirit.

Last Sunday’s online liturgy and a new Wednesday night online Compline, which will start next week, are just two ways we have started to adjust to what will be our new temporary normal. Besides our services going online, we are also sending notes, making calls, and having time together on various social media platforms. Keeping connected is so important to our Saint Paul’s community. We are all in this together supporting each other. God is making his presence known in all these wonderful interactions.

Two weeks ago, when we suspended our in-church services and closed the doors of the church, we hoped to reopen our doors April 1. Unfortunately, with the Stay-at-Home orders from Governor Walz and recommendations from Bishop Prior, we continue to be closed to holding any kind of in-person or public gatherings. The current recommendation from the Bishop is through mid-May. Although disappointing, this is necessary to keep all of us and our neighbors healthy. Please understand that the church will be locked and closed to all church-related activities.

Governor Walz and recommendations from Bishop Prior, we continue to be closed to holding any kind of in-person or public gatherings. The current recommendation from the Bishop is through mid-May. Although disappointing, this is necessary to keep all of us and our neighbors healthy. Please understand that the church will be locked and closed to all church-related activities.

Earlier this month we formed a COVID-19 response team. This team, made up of staff and Vestry members, is supporting and helping us live into this new temporary normal. This group will continue to watch for new ways for us to keep connected. They will watch for guidance from Episcopal Church of Minnesota (ECMN), the Minnesota Department of Health, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and the World Health Organization (WHO). I am so proud of the work they are doing and the amazing amount of love and care they have for our members.

Continue to watch for updates in your email, on Saint Paul’s Facebook page, or on our website. And don’t forget you too can help us keep connected – use our Realm online directory to reach out to your church family.

Stay healthy and know that God is with us, Beth

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